Blood Drive brings A-Positive feeling

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Cole Krakowiak (12) anticipates the needle. Krakowiak was one of 130 people who donated to the cause this year.

Alayna Wallace

A student who gives his blood can save up to three lives, making him or her not only a “donor,” but a “saver” too.

Hosted by the National Honor Society on Sept. 26, American Red Cross Blood Drive received donations from 130 students, a tradition that has been running through Lake Central’s “veins” for years.

“The National Honor Society has done it here for probably about 10 years now. So when I took over NHS it kind of just passed to me from the previous sponsor,” Ms. Rhonda York, English, said.

Although the event does not happen without hard work, Ms. York understands the major contribution students are making when they partake in the cause.

“The process is very stressful for me, but we always try to get as many people down here as we possibly can because we know how badly the area needs the donations,” Ms. York said.

A common reason for participating may be the desire to help others, but with help may come minor discomfort.

“I passed out. It was weird. I was just sitting there and wanted to go get lunch. I told Ms.York I was going to go, and then I got really tired. I sat down and put my head down. Then I woke up facing the ceiling. I guess I passed out for like 10 seconds,” Lexi Martinez (12) said.

Although the turnout was lower than previous years, Ms. York has high hopes for the next one.

“I’m hoping we will have a bigger blood drive in the spring because more people will be 16, and I’m hoping some of the newly 16-year-olds will be able to come and donate,” Ms. York said.

A pint of blood may have been taken, but the rewards of giving leave many feeling completely full.

“It’s a type of charity. Blood is so precious, and nothing is going to happen if you donate a little bit,” Navneet Kaur (12) said.