Do’s and dont’s for back to school

Hannah+Mickelson+%2810%29%2C+Kayli+Cinco+%2810%29%2C+Hayley+Skrezyna+%2810%29%2C+and+Morgan+Dines+%2810%29+gather+in+the+new+library+to+study+before+school+on+Wednesday%2C+Sept.+2.+Students+have+been+using+the+library+as+a+quiet+study+area+in+the+morning.+

Hannah Mickelson (10), Kayli Cinco (10), Hayley Skrezyna (10), and Morgan Dines (10) gather in the new library to study before school on Wednesday, Sept. 2. Students have been using the library as a quiet study area in the morning.

Lana Miramontes

With the return of school, stress and anxiety is weighing down on students. Balancing extracurriculars and pacing through the workload can be a hassle, but students and teachers can adjust to school by using strategies to help alleviate that stress.  

“[For going back to school], do stay organized and use the agenda books not just for passes,” Miss Amanda Allen-Breski, Math, said.

The Indian Guides are a popular way for students to remain organized during the school year. They offer calendars that inform students about upcoming events, along space to write down assignments and activities for their classes.

“I color code [assignments] from most to least important. This saves a lot of time when I begin my homework and allows me to know which assignments I must finish and which assignments that I can relax about because I know I still have time,” Hayley Skrezyna (10) said.

As the first few days of school are over, it becomes a larger struggle for students to get the amount of sleep they need. 

“Try to start your homework as soon as you get home from school or an extracurricular, so you have time for yourself and can allow more time for sleep,” Jordan Olson (10) said.

Balancing personal time and school time can help manage stress, and allow students to have more control in their life. 

“I would say that the biggest mistake of dedicated students is taking on more than what they can handle. My advice would be to stay realistic in your goals to the point where you are still challenging yourself, yet not overwhelming yourself,” Katlyn Arndt (11) said.