Opinions on Trump ditching the debate

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the Mississippi Coast Coliseum in Biloxi, Miss., on Saturday, Jan. 2, 2016. (Used with limited license: John Fitzhugh/Biloxi Sun Herald/TNS)

Emily Badger

Although it may seem like politics does not affect students at the high school level, the current election will play a major role in students’ lives. While many do not care about politics, there are a number of students who are politically aware and keep up with the election. Last Thursday, a Republican party debate was held on Fox News, and leading candidate Donald Trump did not attend, sparking controversy across the map on whether or not he made the right decision.

“A future president should appear powerful, and therefore should attend events [like debates]. [Trump] backed out just because he didn’t like the news anchor, which shows that he’s weak. I don’t think that was a smart move,” Lily Camilleri (11) said.

Smart move or not, statistically Trump’s lack of participation in the debate will not change where he stands in the race.

“I’m not a fan of Trump, but I think it was a good move of him to not go to the debate, because he’ll still be in the lead. The Fox newscaster does not act neutral toward all of the candidates, [and] she shouldn’t be singling out Trump,” Sarah Spivak (11) said.

Students have their opinions now, but soon they will get the chance to form new ones with what happens in the Iowa caucuses.  

“I think [Donald Trump] is a coward for not going to this past debate because if he actually cared about the things he says that he stands for, he would’ve gone and tried to explain his issues, especially because it was the last debate before the caucuses,” Gavin Baisa (11) said.