Q&A: Sarah Gross (10)

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Sarah Gross (10) posing for homecoming.”My favorite part [about homecoming] was probably the punch and just dancing in general.” Gross said.

Justyce Reed

Q: When were you adopted?

A: “I was adopted September of 2010.”

Q: Where were you adopted from?

A: “Guangzhou, China.”

Q: How did you feel when they told you you were getting adopted?

A: “I felt grateful to have a family because I was able to start a new life.”

Q: What was your first impression of your adoptive parents and sisters?

A: “They looked completely different to what I was used to seeing in China.”

Q: If you could, would you revisit your orphanage?

A: “Yes, I would. I would like to see the changes they made to the place.”

Q: How did you adjust from being in China to being in America?

A: “I made new friends, and I learned as I adapted to the new environment.”

Q: What grade did you go into after being adopted and how was your first day of school like in America?

A: “Second grade. My teacher told my new peers to say ‘hi’ to me in Chinese. To be honest. It made me feel uncomfortable.”

Q: Who taught you to speak fluent English?

A: “Mrs. Glatt, she was a helper at Watson Elementary.”

Q: Can you still speak Chinese?

A: “No, I forgot it all and I didn’t think it was important at the time, but now I regret my decision because I could’ve used that to my advantage for future jobs.”

Q: What are your favorite Chinese snacks?

A: “White Rabbit candies, Tang Crackers, Meiji and Moon Cakes.”

Q: Did the kids of your new school treat you differently when you first transferred?

A: “No, they were surprisingly nice to me.”