Marching toward victory

Marching+band+practices+basics+in+the+hot+summer+sun.++They+were+warming+up+so+they+could+practice+and+clean+the+parts+of+their+show+for+Friday%E2%80%99s+football+game.

Marching band practices basics in the hot summer sun. They were warming up so they could practice and clean the parts of their show for Friday’s football game.

Hannah Hill

Marching band is known for their rigorous summer practices that help them prepare for their upcoming competition season in the fall. Camille Matasovsky (10) understands the difficulties of almost 12 hour practices.  

“This year [the instructors] really pushed us harder than they ever have because we really want to be good this year,” Matasovsky said.  “We know what it takes and we’re all dedicated to doing what it takes.”

Summer band camp started three weeks before classes began this year and would typically last from 8:00 am until 6:00 pm. Once all the instruments and equipment were set up, the band went right into action.

“In the beginning of the day, for two hours or an hour and a half, you do basics, which is where you get in this big block of people and we’ll all take one step,” Matasovsky said. “We could take one step for 20 minutes.”

After the band finishes warming up with basics, drills and exercises, they begin practicing for their show.

“It’s called ‘In Her Eyes’ and it’s about Medusa. The show has six parts, but by the time summer practice was over we finished three parts,” Matasovsky said.

After practicing in the hot summer sun for a few hours, the band got a one hour lunch break.  

“The worst part was after lunch because you just ate so much because you were so hungry, and our instructors will push us to the very limit. There were a lot of people who threw up and we were expected to just get over it, and get back on the field,” Matasovsky said.  “I always felt nauseous because I was so hot.”

Although summer band camp is a tall order for many students, Matasovsky said the band benefited immensely from those practices.

“Those three weeks are the absolute worst. It doesn’t get easier, but basics and drills have shortened since after school practices have started,” Matasovsky said.  “We were pushed so hard that our performance has come together easier.”