Bringing light to Bohr’s Theory

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Kaylyn Lee (10) and Allison Magura (10) observe the flame to identify what chemical was being burned. Chemicals that burned blue had a high energy.

Rachel Front

On Tuesday, Oct. 11, Mrs. Roberta Harnish’s, Science, chemistry class learned about Bohr’s
Theory of Light by doing a flame test. The class used different chemicals to see what color they released as energy.

“This test was about defining different levels of energy in different elements. When an element is red in the flame, it has a low energy level, but when it’s blue it has a higher energy level. I think this test is cool because it shows us how different elements have different chemical properties,” Natalie Cangiano (10) said.

The students will not only be able to apply this test to what they are learning, but will now be able to use it in in future lessons that go more in depth.

“What we will do next is look at the amount of energy in each color of light, and we will use more specific tools to help students see that the light that they saw in the flame test is actually a combination of different lights. It’s important to do labs because we remember best when we do. If you can actually experience it, it helps you remember it and understand it better” Mrs. Harnish said.