Scandal in Schools

Parents walk past the University of Southern California’s admissions board.  The parents, with students, were touring the school after the incident.

Parents walk past the University of Southern California’s admissions board. The parents, with students, were touring the school after the incident.

Claire Faberbock

Applying for colleges can be a very stressful situation with many questions going through someone’s head like “Will I get into my dream school?” or “What schools should I even apply to?” but not all of the stress is on students. Some parents will do all it takes to get their child into their dream school.

Starting in 2011, dozens of wealthy famous parents were bribing athletic directors, SAT/ACT administrators, exam proctors, a college administrator and a CEO of a college admissions prep company to help their children get into prestigious colleges. Some of the schools include University of Southern California, Stanford University, Georgetown University and Yale University.  Actresses such as Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman are among the ones who face federal charges because of these crimes. Trying to get their children into Ivy League schools, the parents paid anywhere from $15,000 to $75,000 to help their child get a better score. William Rick Singer, CEO of a college admissions prep company called Key, designated a specific person, Mark Riddell, to secretly take the standardized test for the students.

Another way the parents tried to get their kids into college was faking athletic credentials.  Several athletic coaches were charged with faking recommendations for students to be accepted on the basis of a sport when that student has never even practiced that sport previously.

All around the country, parents and students alike are furious over the scandal. Several people have taken to filing a federal lawsuit against the institutions.  While the universities themselves are not at fault, this scam has corrupted the college admissions process and caused doubt all across the nation.