Competing in Science

Working+on+his+experiment%2C+Marcus+Cymerman+%2811%29+tries+to+distinguish+what+his+solution+will+be+to+achieve+his+goal+of+finishing+the+wooden+car.+Cymerman+and+his+group+have+been+joining+together+and+working+hard+on+the+gravity+vehicle+for+several+weeks%2C+and+they+hope+to+win+in+the+competition.

Working on his experiment, Marcus Cymerman (11) tries to distinguish what his solution will be to achieve his goal of finishing the wooden car. Cymerman and his group have been joining together and working hard on the gravity vehicle for several weeks, and they hope to win in the competition.

Jessica Enriquez and lakecentralnews

With dedication, commitment and ambition, Science Olympiad is preparing and working hard for their next competition, the Whiting Invitationals on Dec. 1.

Out of the 24 different events in the competition, small groups organize themselves to work on their building or study events. The teams must pay attention to the manual rules and expectations, because without being precise, they can easily be disqualified.

Sarah Dingman (10) , Daniel Guzman (11) and Marcus Cymerman (11) are working on one event called gravity vehicle. This vehicle relies on gravity and will ride along a ramp. To achieve their goal, the competitors need to control the car to stop it at a certain rate.

Last year, the team placed in the top 5 at Regionals in every single event. After last year, the group suffered a loss of many students who contributed to Science Olympiad.

“We lost a whole lot of seniors, and it’s hard to replace what we lost,” Mrs. Mary Joan Martin, Science, said.

For the competitions every year, the group has a designed banner for representing the Lake Central Science Olympiad. They decided to have their banner created with gray duct tape.

“Duct tape is what we’re known for. If any of our items for competition need to be fixed we always fix it with duct tape, which will always be in our toolbox,” Brandilyn Stockton-Fresso (10) said.

Sharing the knowledge of science has created a bond among the students and their coach, and this has had an impact on them.

“I didn’t want this job at first, but once the kids came in, I fell right into it. They’re passionate about science. That’s why it got so addicting. They enjoy it so much that they come in and work on labs on Saturdays when a typical kid would be out with friends, “ Martin said.